Owning a self-storage business, at last!

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My last post was about me becoming a property developer. This was possible since I sold my hotels. Becoming a property developer was the first step in my new quest to become a property tycoon, which naturally fits in very nicely with being a dividend tycoon.

While my property development company will in fact pay out a healthy dividend, they do also retain 70% of the profits for new developments, which limits the income yield compared to a pure property stock. As such I felt I also wanted some property stocks that will pay me rental income come rain or shine. The development business could be up and down depending on the economy, but a decent REIT (Real Estate Investment Trust) should pay out under all conditions.

Given the above, I was very happy to have some funds from the sale of my hotels in order to buy a stock I have had my eye on for ages. It is a self-storage REIT, called stor-age. (https://stor-age.co.za/)

Why I wanted a self-storage business?

The self-storage business has been appealing to me for some time. It looks so easy and profitable. I often drove past a fairly large one close to where I used to live. From the outside you could see lines and lines of garages. At one point I needed storage and found out that it was basically full up. What struck me however was that whenever I drove past, there was rarely any movement or activity. You might think that strange but when you consider that once a person takes out storage, the average time they leave their goods in storage is well over a year. So while perhaps a couple of people move goods in or out each day, you have a couple of hundred garages each silently generating revenue. Being garages, you do not have plumbing problems or difficult tenants. They also do not need to be upgraded every couple of years with the latest floor tiles or bathroom taps. Sounds good to me!

With this promise of easy and almost passive income you cannot blame me for wishing I owned a self-storage business. Alas the capital requirements are huge and I would not be able to raise it myself from banks, besides the fact that I do not have any actual experience in the storage business.

However, the beauty of the stock market is that you can become a part owner of some of the best businesses in the world by buying a share in the business. I have been watching this particular share since it came to the stock market in 2015. I also know them from their large sites that one can see dotted around as they have a very distinctive red color theme.

stor-age1
A typical outside image
Stor-Age-Self-Storage-Claremont-Retail
Clean and modern inside

I also know them as I once visited a branch as a prospective client, in the name of stock research of course, and was very impressed by their modern and clean facilities, as well as friendly staff. It is a well managed business, and I would say is the best in this particular niche of the property business.

Now I realize that owning stock is not the same as owning a whole self-storage business myself, but it is a start, and I can think of a few good reasons for rather owning the stock:

  1. I do not run it myself. I say it is an easy business, but it would still require your presence and time, you would still need to hire potentially difficult employees. Sitting at a desk looking into stocks is probably a better job.. and the only difficult employee is me..
  2. There are lots of rather shabby looking self-storage businesses around. I got to pick the best run one, the most innovative one, and a business with very ambitious expansion plans.
  3. I did not need to take out a large loan in order to enter the business, as one would most likely need if starting the business yourself.

I would also say that while I may have a fairly small portion of a self-storage business, I do not plan to stop here. As long as the price is reasonable I will add to my holding over time and look to re-invest the dividends back into the business. As such my stake in the business will get larger over time. I also do not plan to sell my stake even if the stock gets a little bit expensive.

My entry price was at at a dividend yield of just over 8% and the price has moved up a bit since then, but I have not completed the building of my own self-storage business yet.

Conclusion

I hope you can see from this post why I believe that you can become a dividend tycoon by owning stakes in great businesses, just like a tycoon would start any other business.

This business happens to be in the property business. My recent efforts have been aimed at property, and I now have three good businesses in the property business. In fact I have five but I will write about the new additions in a later post. I feel good about the diversification the property businesses have added on my path towards becoming a dividend tycoon, and especially like the high dividend yields they provide.

My focus is still on operating businesses, rather than property itself, but hey, everybody needs a roof over their heads, or at least a place to store their goods.